Process tracing workshop at BIGSSS Hamburg

This week Thursday and Friday I will offer a two-day workshop on ‘Process Tracing’ at the Bremen International Graduate School of Social Sciences (BIGSSS). Expecting 14 participants with very divers backgrounds and research foci, I am looking forward to some interesting discussions about case study methods in general and their research projects in particular.

In honor of this workshop — and the many that came before it and, hopefully, the many that will still follow — I also just inaugurated a new page to my website dedicated to my process tracing activities. If you are interested: have a look!

Process tracing workshop at GIGA Hamburg

Tomorrow and Wednesday I will be at the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) in Hamburg to offer a two-day workshop on process tracing methodology.

Introduction to process tracing
Process Tracing (PT) is a within-case method that focuses on tracing causal mechanisms – the actual ‘link’ between a trigger (X) and an outcome (Y). This workshop will introduce you to the essentials of this method, its main underlying assumptions and its applicability. We will discuss what causal mechanisms are, how we can ‘trace’ them and what kind of causal inferences we can draw on the bases of a process-tracing study. Moreover, to position PT in the broader methodological field we will look at how PT relates to, but differs from, other (larger- and small-N) case study methods and discuss what understanding of causality underlies process-tracing. This introduction to PT will take a hands-on approach applying the new insights to concrete examples and to the participants’ research projects. The first day we will cover most methodological ground and theoretical debates, the second day is largely reserved for debating practical questions and applicability by means of discussing some of the participants’ own research and applications of PT.

See the website of the GIGA for the workshop outline.

ECPR Winter School in Methods and Techniques 2018

Process Tracing Methodology – WB104 – Introduction to Process Tracing

I’ll be offering an introductory course on Process Tracing Methodology at the upcoming ECPR Winter School for Methods and Techniques March 2-9 at the University of Bamberg.

Introduction to process tracing
Process Tracing (PT) is a within-case method that focuses on tracing causal mechanisms—the actual ‘link’ between a trigger (X) and an outcome (Y). This course will introduce you to the essentials of this method, its main underlying assumptions, and its applicability. We will discuss what causal mechanisms are, how we can ‘trace’ them, and what kind of causal inferences we can draw on the bases of a process-tracing study. Moreover, to position PT in the broader methodological field we will look at how PT relates to, but differs from, other (larger- and small-N) case study methods and discuss what understanding of causality underlies process-tracing

This introduction to PT will take a hands-on approach applying the new insights to concrete examples and, when possible, to the participants’ research projects. Most benefit is to be expected if participants are able to use parts of their own research in the exercises during the course. All participants are expected to have read the indicated literature, and to have familiarised themselves with case study methods more broadly and process tracing in particular.

For more information and a full course outline: ECPR website.

ECPR Summer School in Methods and Techniques 2017

I’ll be offering the second week course on Process Tracing Methodology at the upcoming ECPR Summer School for Methods and Techniques Aug 7-11 at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary.

Process Tracing Methodology II – Evidence and Empirical Testing in Practice
This course is a more practical, hands-on course in using Process Tracing (PT) methods in one’s own research. It complements the theoretical PT I Summer School course held in the first week, as well as the introductory course taught at the Winter School in Bamberg.

The course focuses on how we can use within-case evidence to make causal inferences about mechanisms. The course starts with an introduction to how we can make causal inferences using Bayesian logic, i.e. when we have no variation upon which to make inferences. We then turn to the practicalities of empirical testing and making causal inferences in days 2 and 3, focusing on how we can strengthen the inferences we can make by improving the empirical tests that we employ in our research. We will work on this topic using a combination of analysis of existing work and tests developed based on your own research. Day 4 discusses inductive theory-building using PT. The final day discusses how we can utilize PT in practical case study research.

The course requires active participation. It is expected that participants are able to use parts of their own research in the exercises and group work during the course

For more information and the full course outline: more information.